Monthly Archives: November 2017

The Secret Behind Your Cravings for Unhealthy Snacks

Most people associate cravings with pregnant women…you know, pickles dipped in peanut butter or cookie dough and mustard.  However, we all tend to have cravings from time to time and research suggests that these cravings are caused by a mineral or vitamin deficiency within our bodies.  In other words, it’s your body “talking” to you like this, “Hey Lucy, I just checked our magnesium level and it’s awfully low, so why don’t you go scarf about 300 M & Ms because, you know, M & Ms are chocolate and chocolate is chock full of magnesium and never mind all those empty calories that come along with 300 M & Ms because we’re getting the magnesium that we’re lacking so it’s all good.” (our bodies tend to talk to us in long, run-on sentences…a little known fact).

Well, guess what?  There are other sources of magnesium aside from high calorie chocolate.  Wait, hold up, why do we need magnesium in the first place?  I’ll tell you…we need it as it helps with blood pressure regulation, blood sugar control, and protein synthesis and a prolonged deficiency can lead to osteoporosis, tension, migraine headaches and anxiety and depression.  So the next time you find yourself craving chocolate, it could be your body telling you something.  In that case, reach for some almonds, a banana, black beans, spinach or chard rather than the high calorie chocolate.

Your cravings for sugary snacks follow the same rule as above with the only difference being what your body is lacking and hence, craving.  This time it could be low levels of chromium, phosphorus, sulfur and/or tryptophan.  Chromium supports insulin function which helps regulate blood sugar levels and a lack of it has been linked to glucose intolerance which can lead to type 2 diabetes.  Instead of feeding your chromium craving with jelly beans, keep some pears or Brazil nuts on hand, or hit up a raw bar for some mussels or oysters.

Phosphorus is essential for skeletal and organ health and a deficiency can lead to osteoporosis, joint and muscle aches and anxiety.  So put away the Skittles and instead nosh on some sunflower seeds, almonds, brown rice or tuna.

As for sulfur, it’s essential for liver metabolism, anti-oxidant defense and joint health and a shortage is linked to fatigue, depression and degenerative diseases.  As good as Mikes and Ikes are, put ‘em away and grab an avocado or make a salad with tomatoes, cabbage and onions.

Lastly, tryptophan is an amino acid that assists in the production of niacin and serotonin which is tied to healthy sleep and stable mood.  And yes, turkey is a good source of tryptophan as explored in episode six, season nine of Seinfeld in which Jerry drugs his girlfriend with turkey, heavy gravy and wine to induce sleep so that he can play with her vintage toy collection.  Anyway, lack of tryptophan is, as one would expect, tied to sleep and mood disorders.  That being the case, lose the Sweet Tarts and enjoy some pumpkin and chia seeds, pistachios, eggs, or tuna instead.

Finally, if you’re craving salty snacks like chips or pretzels your chloride tank might be a little low usually from excessive sweating, vomiting or diarrhea or from the consumption of diuretics like caffeine.  We usually get plenty of chloride in our diet as it’s present in salt and most processed foods contain plenty of sodium chloride…aka salt.  However, that doesn’t preclude our salty snack cravings.  That being the case, hide the chips and enjoy some lettuce and tomatoes or slather some celery with peanut butter and then pop some olives.

If you’re anything like me, if unhealthy snacks are in the house I WILL eat them.  Therefore, the solution is easy, I keep them out of the house despite the eternal and vocal complaints of my family.  As Socrates liked to say, “know thyself,” and I know if it’s in the house it will get eaten.  I now consistently snack on nuts, seeds, and just about every type of fruit I can find and if my boys come home with excessive amounts of Halloween candy…well, you know the rest of the story.

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It’s Here! The Last Day to Order Your Thanksgiving Dinner.

If you were sitting on the fence, trying to decide whether or not to have MagicKitchen.com prepare and ship a hearty Thanksgiving dinner to your door, then today is D-day…decision day.  If you plan on using our standard, 3-business day delivery service, you must order your meal by 3 PM, Eastern Standard Time, today to ensure you receive it prior to Thanksgiving.  We highly recommend you place your order today to ensure a timely delivery as there are things outside our control, such as weather, out there.  And who wouldn’t want a full Thanksgiving dinner with all the fixins delivered to their front door?  Just askin’.

However, if you wish to use our expedited (and more expensive), one or two-day shipping, then you can push off your decision for another day or so.  In that case, you can order AFTER 3 PM EST on the 14th and BEFORE 3:00 PM EST on Wednesday the 15th, use 2-day shipping, and receive your meal on Thursday the 16th or Friday the 17th.

Or order after 3 PM on the 15th and before 3PM on the 16th, use 1-day shipping, and receive your delicious food on Friday the 17th.  We recommend receiving your food on Friday the 17th in order to allow for the unexpected and to allow you to inspect your food to ensure you have everything you require and that it fully meets with your satisfaction.

If, however, you’re the ultimate procrastinator like your esteemed author (I’m neither “esteemed,” nor an “author,” btw) then Monday the 20th and Tuesday the 21st are the ultimate, last, drop dead days to order and you’ll be forced to pay for 1-day shipping.

If you order after 3 PM EST on Tuesday, the 21st, your food WILL arrive AFTER Thanksgiving even if you use 1-day shipping.  Remember our previous posts regarding the extra stress that arrives with the holidays?  Well please do not cause yourself even more stress by waiting until the last minute to order your Thanksgiving food/meal.

Order Today, that’s an order!  Don’t worry, I was in the U.S. Army for four years, I’m allowed to give orders (except to my wife).

We have meals for 2-4, and meals for 6-8, with choices of Turkey or Ham!  Happy Thanksgiving from MagicKitchen.com!

For more information regarding our delivery schedule, please visit these sites:

http://www.magickitchen.com/delivery.html

http://www.fedex.com/us/service-guide/holiday-schedule.html

Or look at the diagram below:

 

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MagicKitchen.com: The Ultimate Holiday Stress Reliever.

Let’s begin this post by discussing the primary causes of stress for most people during the upcoming holiday season.  After researching these causes on numerous and varied sites on the internet machine, from women’s magazines (apparently, men do not suffer from holiday induced stress as none of the articles I read were located on men’s magazine sites) to health sites, I think I can sum them up in one word…”too.”  That one short word that is often confused with its even shorter homophonic buddy, “to,” was the most common word I encountered during my virtual travels.

When Americans are asked why they feel increased levels of stress during the period from Halloween through New Year’s Day, invariably, the word “too” is used multiple times in their responses.  Too much shopping to do, too much travel, I spend too much money, too many parties, too much entertaining, too much cooking, too much work, too much time with family, stores are too crowded, I eat and drink too much, I’m too exhausted, I’m too hungover, I gain too much weight, my expectations are too high…you get the point.  Well, we here at MagicKitchen.com have a way to keep your stress at a manageable level.

For those of you out there who claim the holidays involve too much shopping, too much entertaining and too much cooking, let us take the all those “toos” out of your world (for some reason, spell check wanted to change “toos” into “toes” and that would totally change the meaning, don’t you think?).  MagicKitchen.com allows you to shop for your holiday meals from the comfort of your own home, in your pajamas while enjoying your favorite latte (and avoid those crowds at the mall and grocery store that are way too big.) Simply peruse our special Thanksgiving meal section or visit our a la carte or complete meal menus and make your selections for whatever holiday shindig (how, exactly, is “shindig” a synonym for “party?” The English language is weird.) you’re hosting or attending.

Our certified chefs will then do all the cooking for you using the freshest ingredients…so much for too much cooking.  Next, your meal will be flash frozen to lock in freshness and taste, packed in dry ice and then delivered right to your door.  Imagine, an entire meal of a whole turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, gravy, rolls, veggies and desert delivered to your front door…one less thing to be stressed out about.

All that’s required of you is to then place our (now your) delicious food in your freezer until the big day and then simply heat it up and serve it to your guests…no mess, no stress.  You have now freed up time in your busy holiday schedule to spend as you desire.  We would suggest you use that time to relax, binge watch your favorite show (Stranger Things seems to be the series du jour right now), spend time with family, learn a new language (ok, that might be a stretch), get outside, grab a movie, tell your friends about MagicKitchen.com (see how I slipped that in there?), read, or engage in your favorite stress reliever.  So there you go, we’ve just removed a couple “toos” from your holidays.

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The Joys(?) of Comfort Food

So, when my awesome MagicKitchen.com boss gave me this topic, I must admit that I thought there wasn’t much to it.  Boy was I wrong.  It turns out that the phenomenon known as “comfort food” has been the subject of numerous psychological, sociological and physiological studies and I learned more about it than I actually cared to.  But not to worry, devoted reader, I won’t bore you with the specifics of the studies or get all “psychological” on you.  I’ll just explain the origins of the term, what constitutes comfort food, and does it, in fact, provide comfort to those that indulge.

It seems the term dates back to a 1966 newspaper article from the Palm Beach Post entitled, “Sad Child May Overeat” (a bit prophetic, that).  In that article, the author stated, “Adults, when under severe stress, turn to what could be called ‘comfort food’ – food associated with the security of childhood, like ‘mother’s poached egg’ or famous chicken soup.”  I have two issues with that 50+ year-old definition of comfort food.  1.  I think I would remove the term “severe.”  And 2.  Since when was a poached egg considered comfort food?  Although, what is considered comfort food can vary greatly from person to person.  The term was finally added to the Oxford English Dictionary in 1997.

Next, I tried to create a generally acceptable definition of comfort food from the myriad definitions out there and here’s the simplified definition I came up with: any food consumed in an attempt to feel better or to enhance already positive feelings.  The reason for the bifurcated definition is due to the fact that men and women (studies reveal) view comfort food quite differently.  Not only are the foods consumed in a desire to attain comfort different between men and women, but the reasons for consuming that food vary as well.

Studies indicate that the trigger, for men, to search out their version of comfort food comes from positive emotions, while women’s need to binge are triggered by negative emotions.  The study emphasizes that this is a trend, rather than a hard and fast truth.  Men can certainly gorge due to negative emotions, as this male can attest to.  When women do seek out comfort food, they tend to eat snack based foods such as chocolate, ice cream, cookies (in baked or dough form), and potato chips.  Men, on the other hand, look for what most people consider traditional comfort food, like meatloaf, pot roast, biscuits and gravy, lasagna, and mashed potatoes.

Other studies tend to link comfort food to feelings of nostalgia or sentimentality.  Remember when you were sick or hurt or found out your crush considered you hideous and your mommy took care of you by making home-made mac and cheese or apple pie?  Or the warm, fuzzy feelings of belonging that were created during the holidays of your childhood when the family sat down together to eat ham, turkey, green bean casserole and strawberry-rhubarb pie?  Well, when we are feeling lonely, stressed, rejected or dejected as an adult, some of us tend to go in search of those warm, fuzzy, “comfortable” feelings of our childhood in the form of food.  In other words, some of us tend to seek solace in the foods that are tied to happier, more care-free times.  Or foods linked with a specific person or place that have positive associations attached to them.

Or do we just use comfort food as an excuse to eat unhealthy junk, as one study alludes to?  This study claims that we can swap comfort food for other things that elicit the same feelings of well-being and warmth, such as a favorite childhood television show, music or book.  I know that watching old episodes of M*A*S*H while listening to Pink Floyd and reading Where the Red Fern Grows certainly makes me feel all warm and fuzzy.

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